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LCA 2004 started at Wed Jan 14 08:00:00 2004.

Speakers

The current list of confirmed speakers is:


Jeremy Allison

Jeremy Allison is one of the lead developers on the Samba Team, a group of programmers developing an Open Source Windows(tm) compatible file and print server product for UNIX systems. Developed over the Internet in a distributed mannor similar to the Linux system, Samba is used by Multinational corporations and Educational establishments worldwide. Jeremy handles the release engineering and the co-ordination of Samba development efforts worldwide and acts as a corporate liason to companies using the Samba code commercially.

He works for the Hewlett-Packard Printing and Imaging Division, who fund him to work full-time on improving Samba and solving the problems of Windows and Linux interoperability.

Jeremy Allison will be presenting:


Werner Almesberger

Werner Almesberger got hooked on Linux in the days of the 0.12 kernel, when studing computer science at ETH Zurich, and he has been hacking the kernel and related infrastructure components ever since, both as a recreational activity, and as part of his work, first during his PhD in communications at EPF Lausanne, and later also in industry. Being a true Linux devout, he moved closer to the home of the penguins in 2002, and now lives in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Contributions to Linux include the LILO boot loader, the initial RAM disk (initrd), the MS-DOS file system, some of the Linux port to the Psion S5 PDA, and much of the ATM code.

Werner Almesberger will be presenting:


Annodex.net Core Team

The Annodex.net Core Team have been squirrelling away on the Annodex media system for the past couple of years. The team has been working with groups as diverse as Xiph.Org, the IETF's av transport working group, SMPTE, and various organisations interested in more efficient media management.

Core Team Members include:

Conrad Parker -- the lead developer of Sweep and long-time advocate of Linux and open source systems, Conrad rocked the house at LCA2003 and the Edinburgh Linux Festival with Scrubby's manic beats and sampling.

Silvia Pfeiffer -- Silvia's background in media standards ensures she can tell what's hot from what's not. Active in Xiph.Org's standards process, she authored RFC3533 and presented an overview of Ogg technolgies at AUUG2003. Silvia impressed all with MPEG Maaate and an analysis of Monty Python songs at LCA2001.

André Pang -- Master of wicked cross-platform hacks, André's pet project Mocha is a Haskell to Objective-C language binding. He is also responsible for vimacs, which provides extensive Emacs emulation in Vim, and is a keen producer of electronic music.

Annodex.net Core Team will be presenting:


Steve Baker

Steve Baker is 29 years old and currently lives in Wellington, New Zealand. He has been involved in the GStreamer project for about 3 years and in that time has worked on many different parts of the GStreamer architecture. He recently presented a GStreamer paper at Uniforum's 2003 NetForum Conference.

During waking hours he can be found in the #gstreamer IRC channel. To pay the mortgage he works as an Independent Software Consultant. He is happily married and would have a pet cat if he weren't highly allergic.

Favorite Technical References:

GTK+/Gnome Application Development by Havoc Pennington

The C Programming Language bu Brian Kernighan & Dennis Ritchie

Steve Baker will be presenting:


behoffski

behoffski will be presenting:


Geoffrey D. Bennett

Geoffrey D. Bennett works for NetCraft Australia as their Senior Systems Engineer, where he gets to play with Linux all day. He runs the LinuxSA Users Group in Adelaide, where he has presented talks on many topics. He also presented a talk at LCA2003 on his revision control system "Katie". In 1999, he helped inspire the "Windows Refund Day" with his Toshiba laptop saga (he still has the cheque, and the laptop). He holds a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Systems Engineering with Honours.

Geoffrey D. Bennett will be presenting:


Sean Burford

Sean Burford has experience in both Unix Programming and Systems Administration, but his core interests include IT Security and Reverse Engineering. He achieved 12th place in the Honeynet Project Reverse Challenge 2002.

Holding a Bachelor of Computer and Information Science from the University of South Australia. Sean has continued his education gaining certifications in Linux Administration (LPI), Solaris 9 Systems Administration (SCSA), and is a Sun Certified Network Administrator.

Sean Burford will be presenting:


James Cameron

James Cameron has been hacking since about 1979 when he started off with his HP-33E calculator and TRS-80. He joined Digital in 1988, has worked in internal systems, product engineering, and then customer support. He started contributing to the Open Source community in about 1995 with the Netrek game project, and began publishing in 1999 after he "went bush". James lives in outback New South Wales with his wife Petria.

James Cameron will be presenting:


Peter Chubb

Peter Chubb has been working with Unix systems since 1979, first at the University of NSW, then with Softway Pty Ltd (now renamed to Aurema Pty Ltd) working (inter alia) on Hibernator, a checkpoint-restart system for IRIX and UXP/M. Peter is now with the open-source Gelato project at UNSW.

He helped form the Sydney Linux User's Group and has in the past been a regular speaker at SLUG and at AUUG's conferences, as well as being a trainer for commercial Unix system administration and programming courses.

His current interests outside Operating Systems Software include fine wines, early music, tropical fish, and playing with his two small daughters.

Peter Chubb will be presenting:


Russell Coker

Russell is employed by Red Hat to develop SE Linux support for future versions of Red Hat server products. He has been an active SE Linux developer for over two years.

Before joining Red Hat he usually ran ISPs.

---

Faye Coker will be assisting Russell with his presentation. She is currently a freelance sysadmin and is working on documenting NSA Security Enhanced Linux. She has been a sysadmin at ISPs in Australia and Europe over the last 7 years.

Russell Coker will be presenting:


Damian Conway

Damian Conway is known as the "Mad Scientist of Perl". He has a Ph.D. in Computer Science and currently an Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

A popular speaker and trainer, he is also the author of several infamous modules including: Parse::RecDescent (parsing without lexing), Lingua::EN::Inflect (English transformations without a dictionary), Lingua::Romana::Perligata (Perl programming without English), Class::Multimethods (polymorphism without objects), Quantum::Superpositions (quantum computing without tears), and Coy (error messages without karma). A three-time winner of the Perl Conference's Larry Wall Award, Damian is now banned from future competition on the grounds of being unfairly weird and instead has the conference's Best Technical Paper named after him.

Damian is closely involved in the design of Perl 6, where his job is to tempt Larry with evil ideas and to explain Larry's apocalyptic visions.

He also runs an international IT training company -- Thoughtstream -- which provides programmer training from beginner to masterclass level throughout Europe, North America, and Australasia.

He lists his technical interests as: programming language design, teaching programming, object orientation, software engineering, natural language generation, synthetic language generation, emergent systems, declarative programming, morphing, human-computer interaction, geometric modelling, the psychophysics of perception, nanoscale simulation, and parsing.

In his spare time, he travels barefoot across the U.S. -- teaching, playing his flute, having alopecic flashbacks, preaching pacifist philosophy, and generally beating the tar out of bad guys with his deadly kung-fu skills.

Damian Conway will be presenting:


Jonathan Corbet

Jonathan Corbet is a co-founder of LWN.net and a co-author of Linux Device Drivers, Second Edition (and the forthcoming Third Edition). He has been working with Unix-like systems since he was given access to an early BSD release running on a VAX 11/780 in 1981. Jonathan lives in Boulder, Colorado, USA with his wife and two children.

Jonathan Corbet will be presenting:


Michael Davies

Michael has been fortunate to be able to work on many varied systems and in many domains. He's developed embedded systems, large-scale multi-person simulations, network software, user interfaces and web applications.

He is a technology junkie, who writes software, herds cats, gives training, occasionally is a BOFH, and does some external consultancy. Right now his favourite thing is playing with python under GNOME and C# in mono - in fact anything but organising conferences :-)

Sometime back in Linux kernel 2.0.x days he was re-introduced to Linux and open-source and is now a certified zealot. Often referred to in his day-job as the "Linux guy", Michael hopes that one day he'll find nirvana and get paid to develop open-source software for a living.


Bdale Garbee

Bdale is a former Debian Project Leader, and as HP Linux CTO helps to ensure Linux will work well on future HP systems. His background includes many years of both UNIX internals and embedded systems work. He helped jump-start ports of Debian GNU/Linux to 5 architectures other than i386.

When Bdale isn't busy trying to keep his basement compute farm full of oddball systems running various flavors of Unix working, his other big hobby is amateur radio, specifically building amateur satellites.

Bdale Garbee will be presenting:


Jon "maddog" Hall

Jon "maddog" Hall is the Executive Director of Linux International, a non-profit association of computer vendors who wish to support and promote the Linux Operating System. During his career which spans over thirty years, Mr. Hall has been a programmer, systems designer, systems administrator, product manager, technical marketing manager and educator. He has worked for such companies as Western Electric Corporation, Aetna Life and Casualty, Bell Laboratories, Digital Equipment Corporation, VA Linux Systems, and is currently funded by SGI.

He has taught at Hartford State Technical College, Merrimack College and Daniel Webster College. He still likes talking to students over pizza and beer (the pizza can be optional).

Mr. Hall is the author of numerous magazine and newspaper articles, many presentations and one book, "Linux for Dummies".

Mr. Hall serves on the boards of several companies, and several non-profit organizations, including the USENIX Association.

Mr. Hall has traveled the world speaking on the benefits of Open Source Software, and received his BS in Commerce and Engineering from Drexel University, and his MSCS from RPI in Troy, New York.

In his spare time maddog is working on his retirement project:

maddog's monastery for microcomputing and microbrewing

Jon "maddog" Hall will be presenting:


Phil Hazel

Philip Hazel grew up in South Africa. He has a PhD in applied mathematics, and has spent the last 30 years writing general-purpose software for the Computing Service at the University of Cambridge in England. Some major projects were text editors and text formatters for use on an IBM mainframe system. Since moving from the mainframe to Unix around 1990, he has become more and more involved with email. This lead to his starting to develop Exim in 1995, and the PCRE regular expression library two years later. These open source projects have both turned out to be larger and more successful than expected. Outside interests include classical music (as a choral singer and late convert to viola playing), music typsetting, working backstage in amateur theatre, and finding nice places to go walking, preferably not as flat as Cambridgeshire. Philip is married, and has three grown-up sons.

Phil Hazel will be presenting:


James Henstridge

I started using Linux in 1995, and have worked on Gnome since around 1998. I have written a number of packages for Gnome, including libglade, fontilus and the Python bindings. Since the end of 2001, I have served on the Gnome Foundation Board of Directors.

James Henstridge will be presenting:


Simon Horman (Horms)

Simon Horman (Horms) works on various load balancing and high availability and email projects. To this end is involved in various Open Source projects including Linux-HA, Linux Virtual Server and Perdition. His main interest is computer networks and in particular how this makes information accessible to people. He is currently a member of the engineering department at VA Linux Systems Japan.

Simon Horman (Horms) will be presenting:


Janis Johnson

Janis Johnson is a contributor to the GNU Compiler Collection through her job with the IBM Linux Technology Center. She has over 20 years of experience developing and testing compilers and other software development tools while working for a variety of computer manufacturers, including Cray Research and Sequent Computer Systems. Janis has an MS in Computer and Information Science from the Univerity of Oregon. Although based in Oregon, Janis is a member of the LTC's OzLabs team.

Paul Larson is one of the maintainers of the Linux Test Project (http://www.linuxtestproject.org). As a member of the IBM Linux Technology Center, Paul is actively involved in developing test programs and testing the Linux kernel. During the past year, most of his time has been focused on testing the 2.5 kernel (and 2.5 patches), and working with kernel code coverage analysis. He can be reached at plars@linuxtestproject.org.

James Kenefick is developer on the Linux Test Project (http://www.linuxtestproject.org). As a member of the IBM Linux Technology Center, James is actively involved in design and implementation of test and infrastructure automation. He can be reached at parseexception@users.sourceforge.net

Janis Johnson will be presenting:


Greg "groggy" Lehey

Greg Lehey was born in Australia and went to school in Malaysia and England before studying Chemistry in Germany and Chemical Engineering in England. He spent most of his professional career in Germany, where he worked for computer manufacturers such as Univac, Tandem, and Siemens-Nixdorf, the German space research agency, nameless software houses and a large user. Finally he worked for himself as a consultant. He returned to Australia in 1997, where he worked for Linuxcare and IBM as well as continuing his consultancy.

In the course of 30 years in the industry he has performed most jobs, ranging from kernel development to product management, from systems programming to systems administration, from processing satellite data to programming petrol pumps, from the production of CD-ROMs of ported free software to DSP instruction set design. He is a member of the FreeBSD Core Team and an active developer in the FreeBSD and NetBSD projects. He is the author of ``Porting UNIX Software'' (O'Reilly and Associates, 1995) and ``The Complete FreeBSD'' (4th edition, O'Reilly and Associates, 2003). He is also the president of the Australian UNIX User Group. About the only thing he hasn't done is writing commercial applications software.

He is available for short-term contracts and can be reached by mail at grog@FreeBSD.org or grog@lemis.com. Alternatively, browse his home page at http://www.lemis.com/grog/.

When he can drag himself away from his collection of UNIX workstations, he is involved in performing baroque and classical woodwind music on his collection of original instruments, exploring the Australian countryside with his family on their Arabian and Peruvian horses, or exploring new cookery techniques or ancient and obscure European languages.

Greg "groggy" Lehey will be presenting:


Arjen Lentz

Arjen Lentz (34) is originally from Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Since marrying an Aussie, he decided that Australia is a very nice place to live, so together with their black cat they now reside in Kenmore, a Western suburb of Brisbane, QLD.

Arjen started with programming, but has since branched out to writing, translating, marketing, training and consultancy. He has been working for MySQL AB since 2001, primarily as lead technical writer in charge of the MySQL documentation. In addition, he teaches MySQL training courses, and maintains contacts with the MySQL community and other organisations in Australia.

Arjen is always keen to be involved in open discussions with interested parties about MySQL and the possibilities for Open Source. His email address is: arjen@mysql.com

Recent talks at conferences and user groups:

- Mar 2003 Linux Users of Victoria (LUV), Melbourne

- May 2003 Dutch Unix User Group (NLUUG), Netherlands, Spring Conference

- Jun 2003 HCC Unix User Group (HCC Unix GG), Netherlands

- Jun 2003 Dutch Linux User Group (NLLGG), Netherlands=20

- Jul 2003 LinuxTag 2003, Germany

MySQL AB (www.mysql.com) is the Swedish company that owns, develops and supports the MySQL database software, founded in 1995 by Michael (Monty) Widenius and David Axmark.

Arjen Lentz will be presenting:


Rasmus Lerdorf

Born in Godhavn/Qeqertarsuaq on Disko Island off the coast of Greenland in 1968. He has been dabbling with UNIX-based solutions since 1985. Known for having gotten the PHP project off the ground in 1995, the mod_info Apache module and he can be blamed for the ANSI92 SQL-defying LIMIT clause in mSQL 1.x which has now, at least conceptually, crept into both MySQL and PostgreSQL.

He tends to deny being a programmer, preferring to be seen as a techy adept at solving problems. If the solution requires a bit of coding and he can't trick somebody else into writing the code, he will reluctantly give in and write the code. He is on Yahoo!'s platform engineering and infrastructure team in Sunnyvale, California.

Rasmus Lerdorf will be presenting:


Brett Lymn

Brett Lymn originally obtained a degree in Electrical Engineering but promptly ignored his training when he reached the workforce and did software development working on various embedded systems for a defence contractor. After getting sick of impossible deadlines he chose to work with other impossible deadlines and became a Unix system administrator, a job he has been doing for over a decade. His interest in Unix carries over into his spare time where he can be found hacking on various bits of NetBSD, from kernel source to helping maintain and extend the curses library.

Brett Lymn will be presenting:


Jeremy Malcolm

I am an Information Technology lawyer with a successful niche practice in Internet-related law, and am involved at board level in a number of relevant organisations such as the Society of Linux Professionals of WA, the Internet Society of Australia, the Western Australian Internet Association, the Australian Public Access Network Association (as WA Region Coordinator), the WA Society for Computers and the Law (as President) and previously Electronic Frontiers Australia. I have been since 1998 the Manager of Terminus Network Services which specialises in the use of open source software in networked environments and in the development of online systems; I have also established the http://www.linuxconsultants.com.au portal for Linux consultants, and I am a developer of the Debian operating system.

Jeremy Malcolm will be presenting:


Ananth N Mavinakayanahalli

Ananth works at IBM's India Software Lab as a member of IBM's Linux Technology Center. An Electronics and Communication Engineer from University of Mysore, Ananth joined IBM in September 1999. He has worked on IBM's OS/2 Operating System, specifically in the areas of LAN protocols such as NetBIOS, NetBEUI and NetBIOS over TCP/IP. He has been with the Linux Technology Center since the beginning of 2003, as a member of the pSeries RAS team.

Ananth N Mavinakayanahalli will be presenting:


Paul E. McKenney

Paul McKenney is a Storage Software Architect for IBM, with emphasis on Linux, performance, and testing. Prior to that, he was a system architect in the Linux Technology Center, an AIX kernel hacker, and a DYNIX/ptx kernel hacker. Regardless of his designated role, he finds that he is always an RCU activist.

Paul E. McKenney will be presenting:


Marc Merlin

I have been in turn Officer / Vice President / President of the Silicon Valley Linux Users Group.

I started with linux in 1993 with 0.99pl15 and I've been working as a sysadmin for various companies in the Silicon Valley since 1997 (Network Appliance, Silicon Graphics, VA Linux, and now Google)

In my spare time, I break linux on my zaurus in various ways, and install linux software on my empeg mp3 car player

More here: http://marc.merlins.org/perso/resume.html

Marc Merlin will be presenting:


Graeme Merrall

Graeme Merrall is the Engineering Manager for AOL|7 and was responsible in part (but not completely to blame) for the decision to pursue Free Software at AOL|7. He is co-author of the PHP Essential Reference published by New Riders and has spoken at several conferences including the O'Reilly Open Source Convention (OSCON) in 2001.

Graeme Merrall will be presenting:


Jonathan Oxer

Jonathan Oxer is Founder and Technical Director of Internet Vision Technologies, an Australian web application development company with clients around the world. He is also a Debian developer, and was organiser of Debian Miniconf2 which was run in Perth in January 2003 in association with Linux Conf Australia where he presented one of the technical papers. His first book, 'How To Hire A Web Developer And Stay Sane', is soon to be published, while his second book, 'The Debian Universe' is being written live online at www.debianuniverse.com, and his third and fourth books ('Web Applications And Business Intelligence' and 'Disaster Proofing For Small Networks') are already underway. He can be reached at jon@oxer.com.au.

Jonathan Oxer will be presenting:


Keith Packard

Keith Packard has been developing open source software since 1986, focusing on the X Window System since 1987, designing and implementing large parts of the current implementation. He is currently employed by HP as a member of the Cambridge Research Laboratory working on pervasive and mobile computing. He received a Usenix Lifetime Achievement award in 1999 and an Open Source Grand Master award in 2003.

Keith Packard will be presenting:


Conrad Parker

Conrad Parker is the lead developer of Sweep and long-time advocate of Linux and open source systems, Conrad rocked the house at LCA2003 and the Edinburgh Linux Festival with Scrubby's manic beats and sampling.

Conrad Parker will be presenting:


Havoc Pennington

Havoc Pennington has been hacking on GTK+ and GNOME since 1998 or so, and has been at Red Hat since 1999 (currently leading the desktop team). He maintains the metacity, gconf, gnome-terminal, and libwnck components of the GNOME desktop, and works on several freedesktop.org initiatives. Havoc is the author of the first GNOME programming guide, "GTK+/GNOME Application Development," released under a free license. He was the chair of the GNOME Foundation board of directors for the first two years of its existence.

Havoc Pennington will be presenting:


Wayne Piekarski

Wayne Piekarski has recently submitted his PhD in Computer Science at the University of South Australia and has worked in the area of outdoor augmented reality and 3D user interfaces for 4 years. To demonstrate his research work, he developed the Tinmith augmented reality software system, as well as a number of different backpack computers to enable users to experience real time 3D environments while moving around outdoors. Developing these systems has involved the hacking of lots of diverse types of software along the way, as well as the occasional hardware device as well.

Wayne is currently the assistant director of the Wearable Computer Lab at UniSA, one of the leading labs in the world for augmented reality and wearable computer based research. He has been invited to speak about his research at a number of international conferences all over the world, including the last three LCAs and was awarded a much prized LCA best speaker award in 2002! Wayne has worked with Linux since 1995 when he first installed Slackware and kernel 1.1.59, and has used it ever since for his development work.

Wayne Piekarski will be presenting:


Martin Pool

Martin has been working on and with free software since falling in love with emacs on his Amiga many years ago. He currently works at Hewlett-Packard on Linux software for Itanium processor family machines.

Martin is the author of distcc, librsync and Keyring for PalmOS, amongst other things. He has delivered popular speeches at conferences including "Privacy By Design" (Quebec, 2000), LinuxWorld (NYC, 2000) and previous LCAs (Brisbane and Perth).

Martin Pool will be presenting:


Richard Sharpe

Richard Sharpe is an open source software developer who currently lives in the US and works for Panasas, a Network Attached Storage company. He has worked on both Samba and Ethereal over the last few years, and currently helps Panasas use Samba as the basis of its CIFS offering as well as make Samba run fast under FreeBSD. He is also interested in migrating function into the FreeBSD kernel as well as using ToE chips with header splitting to improve the performance of CIFS and NFS.

Richard Sharpe will be presenting:


Dan Shearer

Dan is a technologist with communication skills, who enjoys helping people improve what they do with technology. Dan always likes to present the broader implications of why a particular direction is better in the long term while immediately demonstrating the details of how it is done. Simulation is one of his research interests. Dan thinks that the rate of hardware improvement and the relative robustness/longevity of modern software solutions mean that simulated environments will become very important in the near future as a reliable and secure consolidation technique.

Dan Shearer will be presenting:


Gavin Sherry

Gavin Sherry has been using and working with open source software for the last decade. He is an experience software engineer, specialising in database software development. He has spoken at conferences world wide, advocating the use of PostgreSQL and open source databases in general.

Gavin Sherry will be presenting:


Michael Still (Mikal)

Michael has been working in the image processing field for several years, including a couple of years managing and developing large image databases based on Open Source for an Australian government department. He currently works for TOWER Software, who manufacture a world leading EDMS and Records Management package named TRIM. Michael is also the developer of Panda, an open source PDF generation API, as well as a bunch of other Open Source code.

Michael has a web site at http://www.stillhq.com

Michael Still (Mikal) will be presenting:


Malcolm Tredinnick

By day, Malcolm works for CommSecure, Australia (http://www.commsecure.com.au), developing large, redundant, highly-available systems that mostly interact with banks and stock exchanges. This work is done almost solely on Linux systems using commonly-available Open Source packages with custom modifications as required by circumstances.

By night (and weekends), he contributes to a number of projects and mailing lists. Predominantly working on various GNOME projects, he maintains a few packages and authors various pieces of documentation (such as the GNOME internationalisation guide and portability guide), helps to fix bugs and offers unsolicited opinions on the mailing lists.

Malcolm Tredinnick will be presenting:


Andrew "tridge" Tridgell

Andrew Tridgell is a member of the Samba Team, and a research staff member at the IBM Almaden Research Center. Andrew is best known for his work on Samba, but also likes to dabble in lots of other fun bits of code ranging from TiVo hacking, to rsync and chess programs.

Andrew "tridge" Tridgell will be presenting:


Greg Ungerer

Greg is currently one of the core maintainers of the uClinux project. He first started hacking on it 4 years ago, and did the port to the Motorola ColdFire CPU family. Over the last year Greg has been pushing the uClinux support in Linus's mainline 2.5 series Linux kernels. Greg has been involved in the design and release of many commercial products based on uClinux software over the last few years.

Greg specializes in embedded systems development, having spent more than 10 years developing embedded software. Primarily working on networking equipment, and almost always using UNIX like variants.

Greg Ungerer will be presenting:


Jeff Waugh (jdub)

Jeff Waugh is the head beekeeper of the GNOME Release Team, a Director of the GNOME Foundation Board and former president of the Sydney Linux User's Group. He steals dreams from small children and sells their distilled energy to large multi-national corporations to fund his Free Software habit. He still does not say 'mate'.

Jeff Waugh (jdub) will be presenting:


Matthew Wilcox (willy)

Matthew has been hacking the Linux kernel since 1998 when he contributed a patch to the iso9660 filesystem to understand Acorn extensions. Since then he has been a major contributor to the PA-RISC port, and became the file locking maintainer. He currently works for Hewlett-Packard on the ia64 port. He enjoys playing with his yoyo.

Matthew Wilcox (willy) will be presenting:


Christopher Yeoh

Christopher Yeoh is an employee of the IBM Linux Technology Center, working at OzLabs in Canberra, Australia. He has been using Linux since 1994 and became involved with the LSB in 2000. He has been working on various aspects of the Linux Standard Base, primarily on test suite development and the build environment. He is the technical lead for the LSB build environment.

Christopher Yeoh will be presenting:


Patryk Zadarnowski

Patryk is currently a research (PhD) student in the Programming Languages and Systems group (http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~pls) at the University of NSW. He has been enjoing UNIX/BSD/Linux (and of course TeX) hacking for approximately eight years, and is an eager advocate of the Open Source ideology, active as a comittee member of the NSW chapter of the Australian Unix Users' Group and the owner of the Linux Jewellery Store (http://www.linuxjewellery.com/) His research focuses on the area of formal verification of compilers, with one publication so far in ETAPS'03 in Warsaw (available at http://www.jantar.org/papers/ssa-lambda/.)

All software discussed in the paper is available under the BSD licence from http://www.jantar.org/computers.html.

Patryk Zadarnowski will be presenting:


Con Zymaris

Con Zymaris (conz@cybersource.com.au) is the Editor of the AUUG Journal and also the CEO of Cybersource Pty. Ltd. a long-standing Open Systems and Open Source Professional Services company. Con has been using and programming computers since 1979, and using the Internet since 1989 and is an enthusiastic advocate for open-source software libre, using Linux since 1993. While computers were always a passion which morphed into a career, at the University of Melbourne he actually studied Physics.

Con Zymaris will be presenting:

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