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Lev Lafayette: Duolingo Plus is Extremely Broken

Sat, 2017-06-24 21:04

After using Duolingo for over a year and accumulating almost 100,000 points I thought it would do the right thing and pay for the Plus service. It was exactly the right time as I would be travelling overseas and the ability to do lessons offline and have them sync later seemed ideal.

For the first few days it seemed to be operating fine; I had downloaded the German tree and was working my way through it. Then I downloaded the French tree, and several problems started to emerge.

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Chris Neugebauer: Hire me!

Fri, 2017-06-23 07:03

tl;dr: I’ve recently moved to the San Francisco Bay Area, received my US Work Authorization, so now I’m looking for somewhere  to work. I have a résumé and an e-mail address!

I’ve worked a lot in Free and Open Source Software communities over the last five years, both in Australia and overseas. While much of my focus has been on the Python community, I’ve also worked more broadly in the Open Source world. I’ve been doing this community work entirely as a volunteer, most of the time working in full-time software engineering jobs which haven’t related to my work in the Open Source world.

It’s pretty clear that I want to move into a job where I can use the skills I’ve been volunteering for the last few years, and put them to good use both for my company, and for the communities I serve.

What I’m interested in doing fits best into a developer advocacy or community management sort of role. Working full-time on helping people in tech be better at what they do would be just wonderful. That said, my background is in code, and working in software engineering with a like-minded company would also be pretty exciting (better still if I get to write a lot of Python).

  • Something with a strong developer relations element. I enjoy working with other developers, and I love having the opportunity to get them excited about things that I’m excited about. As a conference organiser, I’m very aware of the line between terrible marketing shilling, and genuine advocacy by and for developers: I want to help whoever I work for end up on the right side of that line.
  • Either in San Francisco, North of San Francisco, or Remote-Friendly. I live in Petaluma, a lovely town about 50 minutes north of San Francisco, with my wonderful partner, Josh. We’re pretty happy up here, but I’m happy to regularly commute as far as San Francisco. I’ll consider opportunities in other cities, but they’d need to primarily be remote.
  • Relevant to Open Source. The Open Source world is where my experience is, it’s where I know people, and it’s the world where I can be most credible. This doesn’t mean I need to be working on open source itself, but I’d love to be able to show up at OSCON or linux.conf.au and be excited to have my company’s name on my badge.

Why would I be good at this? I’ve been working on building and interacting with communities of developers, especially in the Free and Open Source Software world, for the last five years.

You can find a complete list of what I’ve done in my résumé, but here’s a selection of what I think’s notable:

  • Co-organised two editions of PyCon Australia, and led the linux.conf.au 2017 team. I’ve led PyCon AU, from inception, to bidding, to the successful execution for two years in a row. As the public face of PyCon AU, I made sure that the conference had the right people interested in speaking, and that we had many from Australian Python community interested in attending. I took what I learned at PyCon AU and applied it to run linux.conf.au 2017, where our CFP attracted its largest ever response (beating the previous record by more than 30%).
  • Developed Registrasion, an open source conference ticket system. I designed and developed a ticket sales system that allowed for automation of the most significant time sinks that linux.conf.au and PyCon Australia registration staff had experienced in previous years. Registrasion was Open Sourced, and several other conferences are considering adopting it.
  • Given talks at countless open source and developer events, both in Australia, and overseas. I’ve presented at OSCON, PyCons in five countries, and myriad other conferences. I’ve presented on a whole lot of technical topics, and I’ve recently started talking more about the community-level projects I’ve been involved with.
  • Designed, ran, and grew PyCon Australia’s outreach and inclusion programmes. Each year, PyCon Australia has offered upwards of $10,000 (around 10% of conference budget) in grants to people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to attend the conference: this is not just speakers, but people whose presence would improve the conference just by being there. I’ve led a team to assess applications for these grants, and lead our outreach efforts to make sure we find the right people to receive these grants.
  • Served as a council member for Linux Australia. Linux Australia is the peak body for Open Source communities in Australia, as well as underwriting the region’s more popular Open Source and Developer conferences. In particular, I led a project to design governance policies to help make sure the conferences we underwrite are properly budgeted and planned.

So, if you know of anything going at the moment, I’d love to hear about it. I’m reachable by e-mail (mail@chrisjrn.com) but you can also find me on Twitter (@chrisjrn), or if you really need to, LinkedIn.

OpenSTEM: HASS Additional Activities

Mon, 2017-06-19 09:05

OK, so you’ve got the core work covered for the term and now you have all those reports to write and admin to catch up on. Well, the OpenSTEM™ Understanding Our World® HASS plus Science material has heaps of activities which help students to practise core curricular skills and can keep students occupied. Here are some ideas:

 Aunt Madge’s Suitcase Activity Aunt Madge

Aunt Madge is a perennial favourite with students of all ages. In this activity, students use clues to follow Aunt Madge around the world trying to return her forgotten suitcase. There’s a wide range of locations to choose from on every continent – both natural and constructed places. This activity can be tailored for group work, or the whole class, and by adjusting the number of locations to be found, the teacher can adjust to the available time, anywhere from 10-15 minutes to a whole lesson. Younger students enjoy matching the pictures of locations and trying to find the countries on the map. Older students can find out further information about the locations on the information sheets. Teachers can even choose a theme for the locations (such as “Ancient History” or “Aboriginal Places”) and see if students can guess what it is.

 Ancient Sailing Ships Activity Science

Students in Years 3 to 6 have undertaken the Ancient Sailing Ships activity this term, however, there is a vast scope for additional aspects to this activity. Have students compared the performance of square-rigged versus lateen sails? How about varying the number of masts? Have students raced the vessels against each other? (a water trough and a fan is all that’s needed for some exciting races) Teachers can encourage the students to examine the effects of other changes to ship design, such as adding a keel or any other innovations students can come up with, which can be tested. Perhaps classes or grades can even race their ships against each other.

Trade and Barter Activity

Students in years 5 and 6 in particular enjoy the Trade and Barter activity, which teaches them the basics of Economics without them even realising it! This activity covers so many different aspects of the curriculum, that it is always a good one to revisit, even though it was not in this term’s units. Students enjoy the challenge and will find the activity different each time. It is a particularly good choice for a large chunk of time, or for smaller groups; perhaps a more experienced group can coach other students. The section of the activity which has students developing their own system of writing is one that lends itself to extension and can even be spun off as a separate activity.

Games from the Past Kids Playing Tag

Students of all ages enjoy many of the games listed in the resource Games From The Past. Several of these games are best done whilst running around outside, so if that is an option, then choose from the Aboriginal, Chinese or Zulu games. Many of these games can be played by large groups. Older students might like to try recreating some of the rules for some of the games of Ancient Egypt or the Aztecs. If this resource wasn’t part of the resources for your particular unit, it can be downloaded from the OpenSTEM™ site directly.

 

Class Discussions

The b) and c) sections of the Teacher Handbooks contain suggestions for topics of discussion – such as Women Explorers or global citizenship, or ideas for drawings that the students can do. These can also be undertaken as additional activities. Teachers could divide students into groups to research and explore particular aspects of these topics, or stage debates, allowing students to practise persuasive writing skills as well.

Adding events to a timeline, or the class calendar, also good ways to practise core skills.

The OpenSTEM™ Our World map is used as the perfect complement to many of the Understanding Our World® units. This map comes blank and country names are added to the map during activities. The end of term is also a good chance for students to continue adding country names to the map. These can be cut out of the resource World Countries, which supplies the names in a suitable font size. Students can use the resource World Maps to match the country names to their locations.

We hope you find these suggestions useful!

Enjoy the winter holidays – not too long now to a nice, cosy break!

OpenSTEM: This Week in HASS – term 2, week 9

Mon, 2017-06-12 09:03

The OpenSTEM™ Understanding Our World® units have only 9 weeks per term, so this is the last week! Our youngest students are looking at some Aboriginal Places; slightly older older students are thinking about what their school and local area were like when their parents and grandparents were children; and students in years 3 to 6 are completing their presentations and anything else that might be outstanding from the term.

Foundation/Prep/Kindy

Students in the stand-alone Foundation/Prep/Kindy class (Unit F.2) examine Aboriginal Places this week. Students examine which places are special to Aboriginal people, and how these places should be cared for by Aboriginal people and the broader community. Several of the Australian places in the Aunt Madge’s Suitcase Activity can be used to support this discussion in the classroom. Students in an integrated Foundation/Prep/Kindy and Year 1 class (Unit F.6), as well as Year 1 (Unit 1.2), 2 (Unit 2.2) and 3 (Unit 3.2) students consider life in the times of their parents and grandparents, with specific reference to their school, or the local area studied during this unit. Teachers may wish to invite older members of the community (including interested parents and/or grandparents) in to the class to describe their memories of the area in former years. Were any of them past students of the school? This is a great opportunity for students to come up with their own questions about life in past times.

Years 3 to 6 Aunt Madge

Students in Year 3 (Unit 3.6), 4 (Unit 4.2), 5 (Unit 5.2) and 6 (Unit 6.2) are finishing off their presentations and any outstanding work this week. Sometimes the middle of term can be very rushed and so it’s always good to have some breathing space at the end to catch up on anything that might have been squeezed out before. For those classes where everyone is up-to-date and looking for extra activities, the Aunt Madge’s Suitcase Activity is always popular with students and can be used to support their learning. Teachers may wish to select a range of destinations appropriate to the work covered during the term and encourage students to think about how those destinations relate to the material covered in class. Destinations may be selected by continent or theme – e.g. natural places or historical sites. A further advantage of Aunt Madge is that the activity can be tailored to fit the available time – from 5 or 10 minutes for a single destination, to 45 minutes or more for a full selection; and played in groups, or as a whole class, allowing some students to undertake the activity while other students may be catching up on other work. Students may also wish to revisit aspects of the Ancient Sailing Ships Activity and expand on their investigations.

Although this is the last week of this term’s units, we will have some more suggestions for extra activities next week – particularly those that keep the students busy while teachers attend to marking or compiling of reports.

Francois Marier: Mysterious 400 Bad Request in Django debug mode

Sun, 2017-06-11 10:21

While upgrading Libravatar to a more recent version of Django, I ran into a mysterious 400 error.

In debug mode, my site was working fine, but with DEBUG = False, I would only a page containing this error:

Bad Request (400)

with no extra details in the web server logs.

Turning on extra error logging

To see the full error message, I configured logging to a file by adding this to settings.py:

LOGGING = { 'version': 1, 'disable_existing_loggers': False, 'handlers': { 'file': { 'level': 'DEBUG', 'class': 'logging.FileHandler', 'filename': '/tmp/debug.log', }, }, 'loggers': { 'django': { 'handlers': ['file'], 'level': 'DEBUG', 'propagate': True, }, }, }

Then I got the following error message:

Invalid HTTP_HOST header: 'www.example.com'. You may need to add u'www.example.com' to ALLOWED_HOSTS. Temporary hack

Sure enough, putting this in settings.py would make it work outside of debug mode:

ALLOWED_HOSTS = ['*']

which means that there's a mismatch between the HTTP_HOST from Apache and the one that Django expects.

Root cause

The underlying problem was that the Libravatar config file was missing the square brackets around the ALLOWED_HOSTS setting.

I had this:

ALLOWED_HOSTS = 'www.example.com'

instead of:

ALLOWED_HOSTS = ['www.example.com']

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV Beginners June Meeting: Debian 9 release party!

Fri, 2017-06-09 19:02
Start: Jun 17 2017 12:30 End: Jun 17 2017 16:30 Start: Jun 17 2017 12:30 End: Jun 17 2017 16:30 Location:  Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond Link:  http://luv.asn.au/meetings/map

Debian Linux version 9 (codename "Stretch") is scheduled for release on 17 June 2017.  Join us in celebrating the release and assisting anyone who would like to install or upgrade to the new version!

There will also be the usual casual hands-on workshop, Linux installation, configuration and assistance and advice. Bring your laptop if you need help with a particular issue. This will now occur BEFORE the talks from 12:30 to 14:00. The talks will commence at 14:00 (2pm) so there is time for people to have lunch nearby.

The meeting will be held at Infoxchange, 33 Elizabeth St. Richmond 3121 (enter via the garage on Jonas St.) Late arrivals, please call (0421) 775 358 for access to the venue.

LUV would like to acknowledge Infoxchange for the venue.

Linux Users of Victoria Inc., is an incorporated association, registration number A0040056C.

June 17, 2017 - 12:30

Lev Lafayette: Heredocs with Gaussian and Slurm

Thu, 2017-06-08 13:03

Gaussian is a well-known computational chemistry package, and sometimes subject to debate over its license (e.g., the terms state researchers who develop competing software packages are not permitted to use the software, compare performance etc). Whilst I have some strong opinions about such a license, this will be elaborated at another time. The purpose here is to illustrate the use of heredocs with Slurm.

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Danielle Madeley: Applied PKCS#11

Tue, 2017-06-06 23:01

The most involved thing I’ve had to learn this year is how to actually use PKCS #11 to talk to crypto hardware. It’s actually not that clear. Most of the examples are buried in random bits of C from vendors like Oracle or IBM; and the spec itself is pretty dense. Especially when it comes to understanding how you actually use it, and what all the bits and pieces do.

In honour of our Prime Minister saying he should have NOBUS access into our cryptography, which is why we should all start using hardware encryption modules (did you know you can use your TPM) and thus in order to save the next girl 6 months of poking around on a piece of hardware she doesn’t really *get*, I started a document: Applied PKCS#11.

The later sections refer to the API exposed by python-pkcs11, but the first part is generally relevant. Hopefully it makes sense, I’m super keen to get feedback if I’ve made any huge logical leaps etc.

Linux Users of Victoria (LUV) Announce: LUV Main June 2017 Meeting

Mon, 2017-06-05 13:02
Start: Jun 6 2017 18:30 End: Jun 6 2017 20:30 Start: Jun 6 2017 18:30 End: Jun 6 2017 20:30 Location:  The Dan O'Connell Hotel, 225 Canning Street, Carlton VIC 3053 Link:  http://luv.asn.au/meetings/map

PLEASE NOTE NEW LOCATION

Tuesday, June 6, 2017
6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
The Dan O'Connell Hotel
225 Canning Street, Carlton VIC 3053

Speakers:

• To be announced

Come have a drink with us and talk about Linux.  If you have something cool to show, please bring it along!

The Dan O'Connell Hotel, 225 Canning Street, Carlton VIC 3053

Food and drinks will be available on premises.

Before and/or after each meeting those who are interested are welcome to join other members for dinner.

Linux Users of Victoria Inc., is an incorporated association, registration number A0040056C.

June 6, 2017 - 18:30

OpenSTEM: This Week in HASS – term 2, week 8

Mon, 2017-06-05 09:04

This week we are starting into the last stretch of the term. Students are well into their final sections of work. Our youngest students are thinking about how we care for places, slightly older students are displaying their posters and older students are giving their presentations.

Foundation/Prep/Kindy to Year 3

Our youngest students doing the stand-alone Foundation/Prep/Kindy unit (F.2) are thinking about how we look after different places this week. Students in integrated Foundation/Prep/Kindy and Year 1 classes, doing Unit F.6, are displaying their posters on an issue in their local environment. These posters were prepared in proceeding weeks and can now be displayed either at school or in a local library or hall. The teacher may choose to invite parents to view the posters as well. Students in Years 1 (Unit 1.2), 2 (Unit 2.2) and 3 (Unit 3.2) also have posters to display on a range of issues, either at the school, in a local place, such as a park, or even a local heritage place. Discussions around points of view and the intended audience of the posters can help students to gain a more in-depth understanding and critique their own work.

Years 3 to 6

Students in Years 3 (Unit 3.6), 4 (Unit 4.2), 5 (Unit 5.2) and 6 (Unit 6.2) are in the second of 3 weeks set aside for their presentations. The presentations cover a significant body of work and thus a 3 weeks of lessons are set aside for the presentations, as well as for finishing any other sections of work not yet completed. Year 3 students are considering extreme climate areas of Australia and other parts of the world, such as the Sahara Desert, Arctic and Antarctica and Mount Everest, by studying explorers such as Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, Robert Scott and Pawel Strzelecki. Year 4 students are studying explorers and the environments and animals of Africa and South America, such as Francisco Pizarro, the Giant Vampire Bat, Vasco Da Gama and the Cape Lion. Year 5 students are studying explorers, environments and animals of North America, such as Henry Hudson, Hernando de Soto and the Great Auk. Year 6 students are studying explorers, environments and indigenous peoples of Asia, such as Vitus Bering, Zheng He, Marco Polo, the Mongols and the Rus.

Colin Charles: Speaking in June 2017

Sun, 2017-06-04 19:01

I will be at several events in June 2017:

  • db tech showcase 2017 – 16-17 June 2017 – Tokyo, Japan. I’m giving a talk about best practices around MySQL High Availability.
  • O’Reilly Velocity 2017 – 19-22 June 2017 – San Jose, California, USA. I’m giving a tutorial about best practices around MySQL High Availability. Use code CC20 for a 20% discount.

I look forward to meeting with you at either of these events, to discuss all things MySQL (High Availability, security, cloud, etc.), and how Percona can help you.

As I write this, I’m in Budva, Montenegro, for the Percona engineering meeting.

Ben Martin: Six is the magic number

Sun, 2017-06-04 17:01
I have talked about controlling robot arms with 4 or 5 motors and the maths involved in turning a desired x,y,z target into servo angles. Things get a little too interesting with 6 motors as you end up with a great deal of solutions to a positioning problem and need to work out a 'best' choice.


So I finally got MoveIt! to work to control a six motor arm using ROS. I now also know that using MoveIt on lower order arms isn't going to give you much love. Six is the magic number (plus claw motor) to get things working and patience is your best friend in getting the configuration and software setup going.

This was great as MoveIt was the last corner of the ROS stack that I hadn't managed to get to work for me. The great part is that the knowledge I gained playing with MoveIt will work on larger more accurate and expensive robot arms.

Lev Lafayette: The Why and How of HPC-Cloud Hybrids with OpenStack

Sat, 2017-06-03 17:03

High performance computing and cloud computing have traditionally been seen as separate solutions to separate problems, dealing with issues of performance and flexibility respectively. In a diverse research environment however, both sets of compute requirements can occur. In addition to the administrative benefits in combining both requirements into a single unified system, opportunities are provided for incremental expansion.

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