Planet Linux Australia

Syndicate content
Planet Linux Australia - http://planet.linux.org.au
Updated: 43 min 36 sec ago

Chris Smart: Live migrating Btrfs from RAID 5/6 to RAID 10

Fri, 2016-08-26 14:03

Recently it was discovered that the RAID 5/6 implementation in Btrfs is broken, due to the fact that can miscalculate parity (which is rather important in RAID 5 and RAID 6).

So what to do with an existing setup that’s running native Btfs RAID 5/6?

Well, fortunately, this issue doesn’t affect non-parity based RAID levels such as 1 and 0 (and combinations thereof) and it also doesn’t affect a Btrfs filesystem that’s sitting on top of a standard Linux Software RAID (md) device.

So if down-time isn’t a problem, we could re-create the RAID 5/6 array using md and put Btrfs back on top and restore our data… or, thanks to Btrfs itself, we can live migrate it to RAID 10!

A few caveats though. When using RAID 10, space efficiency is reduced to 50% of your drives, no matter how many you have (this is because it’s mirrored). By comparison, with RAID 5 you lose a single drive in space, with RAID 6 it’s two, no-matter how many drives you have.

This is important to note, because a RAID 5 setup with 4 drives that is using more than 2/3rds of the total space will be too big to fit on RAID 10. Btrfs also needs space for System, Metadata and Reserves so I can’t say for sure how much space you will need for the migration, but I expect considerably more than 50%. In such cases, you may need to add more drives to the Btrfs array first, before the migration begins.

So, you will need:

  • At least 4 drives
  • An even number of drives (unless you keep one as a spare)
  • Data in use that is much less than 50% of the total provided by all drives (number of disks / 2)

Of course, you’ll have a good, tested, reliable backup or two before you start this. Right? Good.

Plug any new disks in and partition or luksFormat them if necessary. We will assume your new drive is /dev/sdg, you’re using dm-crypt and that Btrfs is mounted at /mnt. Substitute these for your actual settings.
cryptsetup luksFormat /dev/sdg
UUID="$(cryptsetup luksUUID /dev/sdg)"
echo "luks-${UUID} UUID=${UUID} none" >> /etc/crypttab
cryptsetup luksOpen luks-${UUID} /dev/sdg
btrfs device add /dev/mapper/luks-${UUID} /mnt

The migration is going to take a long time, so best to run this in a tmux or screen session.

screen
time btrfs balance /mnt
time btrfs balance start -dconvert=raid10 -mconvert=raid10 /mnt

After this completes, check that everything has been migrated to RAID 10.
btrfs fi df /srv/data/
Data, RAID10: total=2.19TiB, used=2.18TiB
System, RAID10: total=96.00MiB, used=240.00KiB
Metadata, RAID10: total=7.22GiB, used=5.40GiB
GlobalReserve, single: total=512.00MiB, used=0.00B

If you still see some RAID 5/6 entries, run the same migrate command and then check that everything has migrated successfully.

Now while we’re at it, let’s defragment everything.
time btrfs filesystem defragment /srv/data/ # this defrags the metadata
time btrfs filesystem defragment -r /srv/data/ # this defrags data

For good measure, let’s rebalance again without the migration (this will also take a while).
time btrfs fi balance start --full-balance /srv/data/

Francois Marier: Debugging gnome-session problems on Ubuntu 14.04

Thu, 2016-08-25 16:02

After upgrading an Ubuntu 14.04 ("trusty") machine to the latest 16.04 Hardware Enablement packages, I ran into login problems. I could log into my user account and see the GNOME desktop for a split second before getting thrown back into the LightDM login manager.

The solution I found was to install this missing package:

apt install libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-xenial Looking for clues in the logs

The first place I looked was the log file for the login manager (/var/log/lightdm/lightdm.log) where I found the following:

DEBUG: Session pid=12743: Running command /usr/sbin/lightdm-session gnome-session --session=gnome DEBUG: Creating shared data directory /var/lib/lightdm-data/username DEBUG: Session pid=12743: Logging to .xsession-errors

This told me that the login manager runs the gnome-session command and gets it to create a session of type gnome. That command line is defined in /usr/share/xsessions/gnome.desktop (look for Exec=):

[Desktop Entry] Name=GNOME Comment=This session logs you into GNOME Exec=gnome-session --session=gnome TryExec=gnome-shell X-LightDM-DesktopName=GNOME

I couldn't see anything unexpected there, but it did point to another log file (~/.xsession-errors) which contained the following:

Script for ibus started at run_im. Script for auto started at run_im. Script for default started at run_im. init: Le processus gnome-session (GNOME) main (11946) s'est achevé avec l'état 1 init: Déconnecté du bus D-Bus notifié init: Le processus logrotate main (11831) a été tué par le signal TERM init: Le processus update-notifier-crash (/var/crash/_usr_bin_unattended-upgrade.0.crash) main (11908) a été tué par le signal TERM

Seaching for French error messages isn't as useful as searching for English ones, so I took a look at /var/log/syslog and found this:

gnome-session[4134]: WARNING: App 'gnome-shell.desktop' exited with code 127 gnome-session[4134]: WARNING: App 'gnome-shell.desktop' exited with code 127 gnome-session[4134]: WARNING: App 'gnome-shell.desktop' respawning too quickly gnome-session[4134]: CRITICAL: We failed, but the fail whale is dead. Sorry....

It looks like gnome-session is executing gnome-shell and that this last command is terminating prematurely. This would explain why gnome-session exits immediately after login.

Increasing the amount of logging

In order to get more verbose debugging information out of gnome-session, I created a new type of session (GNOME debug) by copying the regular GNOME session:

cp /usr/share/xsessions/gnome.desktop /usr/share/xsessions/gnome-debug.desktop

and then adding --debug to the command line inside gnome-debug.desktop:

[Desktop Entry] Name=GNOME debug Comment=This session logs you into GNOME debug Exec=gnome-session --debug --session=gnome TryExec=gnome-shell X-LightDM-DesktopName=GNOME debug

After restarting LightDM (service lightdm restart), I clicked the GNOME logo next to the password field and chose GNOME debug before trying to login again.

This time, I had a lot more information in ~/.xsession-errors:

gnome-session[12878]: DEBUG(+): GsmAutostartApp: starting gnome-shell.desktop: command=/usr/bin/gnome-shell startup-id=10d41f1f5c81914ec61471971137183000000128780000 gnome-session[12878]: DEBUG(+): GsmAutostartApp: started pid:13121 ... /usr/bin/gnome-shell: error while loading shared libraries: libwayland-egl.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory gnome-session[12878]: DEBUG(+): GsmAutostartApp: (pid:13121) done (status:127) gnome-session[12878]: WARNING: App 'gnome-shell.desktop' exited with code 127

which suggests that gnome-shell won't start because of a missing library.

Finding the missing library

To find the missing library, I used the apt-file command:

apt-file update apt-file search libwayland-egl.so.1

and found that this file is provided by the following packages:

  • libhybris
  • libwayland-egl1-mesa
  • libwayland-egl1-mesa-dbg
  • libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-utopic
  • libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-vivid
  • libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-wily
  • libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-xenial

Since I installed the LTS Enablement stack, the package I needed to install to fix this was libwayland-egl1-mesa-lts-xenial.

I filed a bug for this on Launchpad.

Maxim Zakharov: Small fix for AMP WordPress plugin

Wed, 2016-08-24 12:03

If you use AMP plugin for WordPress to make AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) version of your posts and have some troubles validating them on AMP validator, you may try this fix for AMP plugin to make those pages valid.